captatony

explorare---conprendere---interrogare

Aug 31

(via snivllus)


chrisprattawesomesource:

Getting in shape with Chris Pratt

(via owl-librarian)


anightvaleintern:

kahtiihma:

fandomsandfeminism:

returntothestars:

ianthe:

!!

dat practical armor

I love every aspect of this.

NO you guys don’t understand, the entire book is like this. They tried to cram in all sorts of representation of different races and the art is gorgeous and it’s GREAT! The picture for a spellcaster is a female human who is wearing BAGGY, NON-SEXUALIZED CLOTHING AND NO MAKEUP because she’s in a dungeon, she doesn’t have time to do her hair cmon.
Also this:


*mildly impressed clapping*


It’s a start

anightvaleintern:

kahtiihma:

fandomsandfeminism:

returntothestars:

ianthe:

!!

dat practical armor

I love every aspect of this.

NO you guys don’t understand, the entire book is like this. They tried to cram in all sorts of representation of different races and the art is gorgeous and it’s GREAT! The picture for a spellcaster is a female human who is wearing BAGGY, NON-SEXUALIZED CLOTHING AND NO MAKEUP because she’s in a dungeon, she doesn’t have time to do her hair cmon.

Also this:

*mildly impressed clapping*

It’s a start

(via faeryofficial)



ask-gallows-callibrator:

eatyourpie:

unicorn-ghost:

i’ve been waiting for this photoset my whole life

thank you

yesyes

i was legit about to get upset but as i scrolled i became happier 

(via allmydreamslostatsea)


Wolves have a basic aversion to fighting and will do much to avoid any aggressive encounters.

It has been observed that a socialized wolf had become frantically upset upon witnessing its first dog fight. The distressed wolf intervened and eventually broke up the fight by pulling the aggressor off by the tail.

David Mech and Luigi Boitani, “Wolves: Behavior, ecology, and conservation”, 2003   (via wolveswolves)

(via allmydreamslostatsea)


sixpenceee:

As someone who wants to study the human consciousness I found this very interesting.

Scott Routley was a “vegetable”. A car accident seriously injured both sides of his brain, and for 12 years, he was completely unresponsive.

Unable to speak or track people with his eyes, it seemed that Routley was unaware of his surroundings, and doctors assumed he was lost in limbo. They were wrong.

In 2012, Professor Adrian Owen decided to run tests on comatose patients like Scott Routley. Curious if some “vegetables” were actually conscious, Owen put Routley in an fMRI and told him to imagine walking through his home. Suddenly, the brain scan showed activity. Routley not only heard Owen, he was responding.

Next, the two worked out a code. Owen asked a series of “yes or no” questions, and if the answer was “yes,” Routley thought about walking around his house. If the answer was “no,” Routley thought about playing tennis.

These different actions showed activity different parts of the brain. Owen started off with easy questions like, “Is the sky blue?” However, they changed medical science when Owen asked, “Are you in pain?” and Routley answered, “No.” It was the first time a comatose patient with serious brain damage had let doctors know about his condition.

While Scott Routley is still trapped in his body, he finally has a way to reach out to the people around him. This finding has huge implications.

SOURCE

(via allmydreamslostatsea)



dutchster:

when you try to flick away a bug but it comes towards you instead

image

(via onlylolgifs)


catsbeaversandducks:

Keep Calm And Love Raccoons

Photos via Raccoons

(via epinephrinedisorder)


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